What's My Citibank Routing Number?

What's My Citibank Routing Number?
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From setting up direct deposit to making ACH payments and wire transfers, you’ll need a routing number to complete many kinds of banking transactions. As a large bank with locations across the U.S., Citibank has a different routing number for each state in which it has branches.

What Is a Routing Number?

A routing number is a nine-digit number banks and other financial institutions in the U.S. use to identify themselves. You can think of them as addresses that let other banks know where to find your money. The routing number you use depends on with which bank you have opened an account, and sometimes where your bank operates.

Routing numbers are also sometimes known as ABA numbers, routing transit numbers (RTNs) and check routing numbers.

What Are Routing Numbers Used For?

Routing numbers were created in 1910 by the American Bankers Association to help process paper checks and enable banks and credit unions to accurately process transactions between themselves and other financial institutions.

Routing numbers come in handy for various types of financial transactions. You’ll probably need to know your routing number if you want to:

  • Set up automatic bill payments and direct deposit
  • Pay with a check
  • Make a wire transfer or ACH payment to someone in the U.S.
  • Have payments like salary and pension deposited into your account

Different Types of Routing Numbers

In addition to standard ABA routing numbers, some banks use different routing numbers used for domestic and international wire transfers. However, Citibank, for the most part, isn't one of them.

In most cases, for domestic wire transfers, you'll use the same Citibank ABA routing number pertaining to the state in which you opened your bank account. However, there are a couple of exceptions: Maryland and Nevada have separate routing numbers for incoming wire transfers.

For international wire transfers, you'll need the Citibank ABA routing number pertaining to your state, but also need a special number called a SWIFT code. Inbound international wire transfers to a U.S. Citibank account require both the ABA routing number and SWIFT code. Meaning, if someone overseas needs to wire you some money, you'll need to provide the sender with Citibank's SWIFT code, which is CITIUS33.

The three types of routing numbers are:

  • ABA: The standard routing number used for direct deposit, electronic bill payments and writing checks, among other transactions.
  • Domestic Wire Transfer: The number used to send money to or receive money from another U.S. bank account (both accounts are domestic).
  • International Wire Transfer (SWIFT code): The number used to send money from a U.S. bank account to a non-U.S. bank account or vice-versa. This is called a SWIFT code.

Citibank Routing Numbers by State

Citibank ABA Routing Numbers by State (C-M)

State

Routing Number

California (Central & Northern)

321171184

California (Southern)

322271724

Connecticut

221172610

Delaware

031100209

District of Columbia (D.C.)

254070116

Florida

266086554

Illinois

271070801

Maryland

052002166 / 254070116 (incoming wires)

US Bank Locations

Citibank ABA Routing Numbers by State (N-V)

State

Routing Number

Nevada (Las Vegas)

122401710 / 322271724 (incoming wires)

Nevada (outside Las Vegas)

322271724

New Jersey

021272655

New York

021000089 / 021001486 (former EAB customers)

South Dakota

021000089

Pennsylvania

021272655

Texas

113193532

Virginia

254070116

US Bank Locations

Citibank Wire Transfers and Swift Code

Citibank Domestic and International Wire Transfer Routing Numbers

Type of Wire Transfer

Routing Number

Domestic wire transfer

Same as ABA routing number (except Maryland and Nevada)

International wire transfer

Same as ABA routing number (except Maryland and Nevada)

SWIFT code

CITIUS33

US Bank Locations

Locating Your Routing Number on a Check

If you have a Citibank check on hand, you can locate your routing number as the first nine digits on the bottom left.

The number to its right, on the bottom middle of your check, is your bank account number. The number on the bottom right is the number of the check itself. These three numbers will be separated by a symbol that looks like a colon used in punctuation, so it should be pretty easy to spot.

Other Ways to Find Your Routing Number

If you check your paper or online bank statement, you can find your routing number there. You can also find your routing number online in the routing directory on the official website of the Federal Reserve.

If you’re not able to find your routing number online or you don’t have a check to look at, you can also call Citibank customer service at 800-374-9700. After you give a few details to identify yourself, a representative can help you locate your routing number.

Information Needed for Wire Transfers

For Citibank domestic wire transfers, in addition to your domestic wire transfer number (which, in most cases, is the same as your ABA routing number), you’ll need to know the following:

  • The name of the person to whom you’re wiring funds as it appears on their account (the “recipient”)
  • The recipient’s account number
  • The ABA routing number of the recipient’s bank
  • The name and address of the recipient’s bank

For Citibank international wire transfers, in addition to Citibank's SWIFT code, you’ll need to know:

  • The name of the person to whom you’re wiring funds as it appears on their bank account (the “recipient”)
  • The SWIFT code of your recipient’s bank
  • The recipient’s account number
  • The name and address of the recipient’s bank
  • The CHIPS UID number (Clearinghouse Interbank Payment System)

Comparing Routing Numbers, SWIFT Codes, BIC and IBANS

Regular routing numbers are sometimes confused with SWIFT codes and other numbers like BIC codes and IBANs.

SWIFT codes, as you now know, are special routing numbers banks use to make international wire transfers. As it turns out, BIC codes are another name for SWIFT codes, short for “bank identifier” codes. So they’re actually the same thing.

IBANs are international bank account numbers, which identify individual bank accounts and are commonly used in Europe.

Learn More About Routing Numbers:

Learn More About Wire Transfers: