Information on the Forever Postage Stamp

Information on the Forever Postage Stamp
••• USPS

The Forever postage stamp can save consumers money when postal rates increase. The Forever stamp can be used for any first-class mail weighing 1 oz.or less. While the price of the Forever stamp increases as postal rates increase, the stamp remains valid no matter how much you paid for it. The image selected for the stamp, the Liberty Bell, has historical significance.

History

The US Postal Service first proposed the Forever stamp to the U.S. Postal Rate Commission in May 2006. The stamp became available to consumers in May 2007 and sold for 41 cents. Artist Tom Engeman, who designed the stamp's Liberty Bell artwork, has created artwork for several other stamps as well.

Function

The Forever Stamp acts as a first-class postage stamp for items weighing 1 oz. or less. The stamp is purchased at the current first-class rate and can be used at any time. Even if postal rates increase, the forever stamp is acceptable regardless of when it was purchased.

Benefits

By keeping Forever stamps on hand, you can be assured that you have the correct postage for your 1-oz. or less first class mail. You won't need to add additional postage when the postal rates increase. The postal service benefits from the influx of cash created by people buying the stamps to prepare for an upcoming rate increase.

Misconceptions

Forever stamps were initially issued at a cost of 41 cents each. Regardless of the price you paid for your Forever stamps or the current cost of first class postage, they are valid for your first class, 1-oz. letter. Initial perceptions were that the stamps could be bought at the same purchase price of 41 cents, forever. This is not true. The price of the Forever stamp increases as postage rates rise.

Considerations

Stocking up on Forever stamps can provide the convenience of having them on hand when a postage rate increase occurs. Any financial benefit from stockpiling Forever stamps is minimal unless you buy major quantities. Consumers who regularly mail 25 or more first class letters per week may find it advantageous to purchase enough stamps for several weeks or months.