How to Redeem Old Chrysler Stock Certificates

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Many people owned Chrysler Corporation shares in their investment portfolios before they merged with the Daimler Company. The last day of trading for Chrysler was November 12, 1998, when the closing price was $47 1/16 per share. (Converted to a decimal that is 6.25 cents) For those still holding onto stock certificates, you can trade them in as you will be granted new shares of stock.

Calculate the amount of shares in total stock certificates. There have been a couple of mergers since 1998 involving the Chrysler Corporation. Originally every share was able to be converted into Daimler Chrysler shares. Now, if an investor is still holding stock certificates, they can turn them in for Daimler shares.

Multiply by the conversion rate. The conversion rate on the shares is as follows: For every one share of Chrysler stock, you will be awarded 0.6235 shares of Daimler. For instance if you have 1,000 shares of Chrysler, you would now be awarded 623.5 shares of Daimler.

Send a letter to Daimler stating the amount of shares you have in stock certificate form and requesting conversion paperwork. There will be paperwork that must be filed with the company along with the IRS and SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) to convert the shares. For every fractional share you have, you will be paid $89.50.

Daimler AG c/o BNY Mellon Shareowner Services P.O. Box 358010 Pittsburgh PA 15252-8010 E-Mail: shrrelations@bnymellon.com 800-470-7418 daimler.com

Fill out and return the paperwork along with your stock certificates. Send every piece of correspondence by a method that can be tracked, such as delivery confirmation. After they receive the stock certificates, you will be issued stock which you can buy, sell or trade along with any money due for fractional shares.

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