Gifts for Cheap People

by Hallie Engel ; Updated July 27, 2017
The right gift will help a friend save long after receiving it.

These days, it's hard not to admire cheapskates. Though in times of excess and wanton spending it might've been easy to make fun of people who pinched their pennies, nowadays saving is in style. Help a thrifty friend keep up her good habits by giving her a present which will help her put away even more for a rainy day.

Coupon Organizer

Help a thrifty friend take charge of his shopping with a coupon organizer. Many frugal folks comb newspapers and the Internet in search of coupons worth anything from a few cents off to a heavy discount on popular goods. But dozens of small slips of paper can end up a wrinkled, disorderly mess. A coupon organizer will keep everything neat and in proper order, allowing the user to make the most of what he has quickly and efficiently, preventing him from losing out on big savings.

Water Filter

Give the gift of great tasting water with a filter. Though most water in America is safe to drink, not all of it tastes good, especially if it has been heavily treated to make it potable. The 20 Something Finance website states that a year's worth of bottled water can cost as much as $1,000 for a single person, meaning a filter brings substantial savings. Add to the gift with a pitcher or set of glasses for drinking freshly filtered H2O.

Seeds

Help a friend grow her own tasty fruits and veggies while reaping a harvest of savings by giving her seeds. Vegetables and fruits are essential to good health, but the cost of buying them can add up, so give a friend seeds so she can grow her own. The Money Crashers website suggests giving heirloom or survival seeds, which unlike seeds plucked from commercially produced veggies, will produce crops with seeds that can be collected and regrown for generations to come.

Personal Finance Books

Help a frugal acquaintance learn about money, saving, spending and investing with a personal finance book. In order to make money go far, get the most out of a savings account, or learn how to properly invest, people need knowledge and direction. And the proper book can guide them along the way. Consider the recipient's needs and interests and choose a title accordingly; a friend in college might enjoy a book about financing a home while an older acquaintance might appreciate a title focused on retirement.

About the Author

Hallie Engel is a food and lifestyle writer whose work has appeared in several international publications. She served as a restaurant critic for "Time Out Abu Dhabi" and "Time Out Amsterdam" and has also written about food culture in the United Arab Emirates for "M Magazine." She holds a bachelor's degree in communications and film studies from University of Amsterdam.

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