What is the Difference Between Managed & Mutual Funds

by Chuck Cox ; Updated July 27, 2017
Managed funds are becoming more popular for beginning investors.

In today's financial markets, investors have many different money investment vehicles available to them. Since mutual funds came along, people who know nothing about stocks are now investing. Different types of managed funds have become available too. How do they differ?

Managed Fund

Managed funds come in many forms. One of those forms is the mutual fund. Mutual funds maintain an asset allocation model based on its particular objectives. They are periodically rebalanced by the fund manager to maintain that asset mix.

SEC rules

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requires that mutual funds adhere to the agency's own set of rules. One such rule is that the SEC restricts the mutual fund manager from performing the riskier types of trades as would be found in a hedge fund. Thus, the mutual fund is a more restricted type of managed fund.

Tools for Average Investors

The biggest reason why mutual funds have gotten so popular is that almost anyone can invest in them. Some of these funds only require a deposit of a few hundred dollars to get started. This is one of the major differences between mutual funds and other types of managed funds. For instance, investors have to earn at least $200,000 annually ($300,000 jointly) to qualify for hedge funds.

About the Author

Chuck Cox started a career as a technical writer in 1992. As a ghost writer, wrote math/statistic lesson plans, and co-authored book on hedge funds through eLance.com. He also has several documents published on eHow. Cox holds a Bachelor of Science in physics and mathematics from East Tennessee State University.

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