What Are the Cost Point Advantages & Disadvantages of Going Green?

by Naomi Vogel ; Updated July 27, 2017
Green earth

Many of us want to go green, but there is always something that stops us. Either we don’t have enough time or we don’t have enough money. Usually the latter of the two is the biggest problem. Many find themselves asking if going green really does cost all that much or if it is just a myth.

Expensive Resources

The unfortunate truth is that the resources needed to use greener sources of energy are expensive. Wind farms, solar power, hybrid electrical cars, organic foods, energy-efficient domestic appliances and other green products cost more money than many people can afford. It is a lot cheaper to use the world-polluting resources we already have.

Everything in Moderation

Fortunately though, “green actions” cost nothing, and can actually save money. For example, if you take a bike instead of a car for that 6-mile trip to the post office, then you will not only be making a greener choice, but you will be saving money on gas. Turning off the lights and eating dinner by candlelight will save you money on the electricity bill--not to mention the fact that eating dinner by candlelight is far more romantic. Turning down the thermostat in winter months and using less air conditioning in summer will also help you save more money and make our planet healthier. These are actions that everyone can do, and they cost nothing.

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Higher Costs Now, Lower Costs Later

If you do spend the extra money on green products and resources, it is true that you will be spending more money now, but in the future you will spend less than if you didn’t. Hybrid cars may cost more money initially, but you won’t be spending all that money on high gas prices. Low-energy bulbs may have a higher number on the price tag, but you don’t have to buy them as often. Plus, If earth continues to survive in a pollution-filled world, everyone’s health could be at potentially higher risk and you may just have to spend more on doctor bills. Natural disasters are also more likely to occur, and then rebuilding your life would cost far more money than it would to go green now.

About the Author

Naomi Vogel started writing professionally in 2009. Vogel has written for "Volume One," "The Leader Telegram," "Spiral Natural Foods" and "The Student Voice." Vogel has a bachelor's degree in journalism and theater from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. Vogel received the Journalism of Excellence Award from her university in 2010.

Photo Credits

  • green globe on green background image by Brent Walker from Fotolia.com
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