Can You Return an iTunes Giftcard?

by Danielle Fernandez
You may not be stuck with that unwanted iTunes gift card.

An iTunes gift card gives you paid access to anything in the iTunes Store -- including music, movies, TV shows, apps and books. If you change your mind and decide that you don't want the gift card, or if it's a gift you can't use, you may not be able to return it to the original retailer. Returns are prohibited by Apple for iTunes gift cards, though state laws -- which take precedence -- governing gift card refunds vary.

Retailer Differences

According to the Apple Store's iTunes gift card purchase page, gift cards are not redeemable for cash, refunds or exchanges unless required by law. This same policy is extended to non-Apple retailers as well. Amazon.com, for example, explicitly refuses gift card returns of any kind -- in the absence of laws saying otherwise -- and both Walmart and Target restate the verbiage used in Apple's iTunes gift card return terms word for word.

Gift Card Laws

Gift card refund laws vary by state and may differ slightly from Apple's return guidelines. In California, for example, any card with a cash value of $10 or less may be redeemed for cash. Oregon, Washington and New Jersey residents can request a cash refund for gift cards with less than $5 -- limited, in most cases, to cards that initially had more than a $5 balance.

Other Exchange or Cash Options

If you're stuck with an iTunes gift card and have no return options available to you, there are still ways to redeem its cash value. You can, for example, sell it online (check the gift card policies on the site you use) with a minimal loss of a dollar or two in fees. There are also websites that help you exchange or cash in on unwanted gift cards, including Plastic Jungle, Gift Card Rescue and Swap a Gift. You can also regift it, or sell it to or trade it with a friend.

About the Author

Based in Tampa, Fla., Danielle Fernandez been writing, editing and illustrating all things technology, lifestyle and education since 1999. Her work has appeared in the Tampa Tribune, Working Mother magazine, and a variety of technical publications, including BICSI's "Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual." Fernandez holds a bachelor's degree in English from the University of South Florida.

Photo Credits

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