Budgeting Games for Kids

by Jim Radenhausen
Budgeting games provide kids with fun and learning.

No matter the economic climate, adults of all ages face the same budgeting challenges: Having enough money for monthly fixed expenses and enough left over for fun or unforeseen expenses. Kids, however, may not think about the challenges that await them once they reach their teen years and beyond. For the children in your life, engage them in budgeting games that will educate and prepare them for those inevitable financial matters.

Board Games

Hasbro's "The Game of Life" offers kids a classic lesson in budgeting as they make life decisions that lead up to retirement. Recommended for ages 9 and up, the game requires players to make post-high-school decisions such as whether to attend college, start a career or have children. Kids must budget their money properly to retire with the most wealth at the end of the game and win. Kids get two money games in Aristoplay's "Moneywise Kids," recommended for ages 7 and up. One game deals with counting money and making change, while the other -- "Bill Breaker" -- tackles money management and budgeting. Kids start with $100 and earn money with each turn. Throughout the game, players draw "moneywise markers" that indicate bills they must pay. The player who collects all six markers and still has $100 in savings wins the game.

Classroom Games

Kids collect money, watch their budgets and pay bills in Attainment Co.'s "Budget City," recommended for grades 4 and up. Aside from cash, players work with savings and checking accounts, credit cards and certificates of deposit. The student with the largest net worth at the end of the game wins. Kids must share money for a good cause as they budget in Marbles Kids Museum's "Moneypalooza," a printable game available at Marbles' site and recommended for kindergarten to grade 5. As they decide how to earn, spend and save money, students also share money with a cause or organization they like. The first player to save $100 and share $25 wins the game.

List Games

Players try to stay within a shopping-list budget in "Plan It," an adult-supervised game recommended for upper-elementary- and middle-school-age kids. After an adult establishes a budget, kids peruse an ad flyer/catalog and make a shopping list. Kids add up the cost of all the items and tell the supervisor whether they think they made the best spending choices. The kid who comes closest to the budget without going over wins the game. Kids compare income and expenses for budgeting purposes in "Understanding the Means," recommended for middle-school- and high-school-age students. Players list their entertainment expenses and figure out the cost. Kids subtract their expenses total from their income of allowance and spending money. The player who has money left over wins.

Online Games

Kids try to save enough money to buy items in "Money Metropolis," available at various sites. After choosing their desired item, players have the chance to earn or spend money at various locations on the map. To earn money, kids do a variety of tasks, including babysitting, pumping gas and bagging groceries. Players have six months to save for their chosen goal in "My Savings Quest," available at various sites. Kids choose a career and create a monthly budget to cover expenses such as rent, food and car insurance, with hopes of having spending money for fun or emergencies.

About the Author

Jim Radenhausen is a freelancer who began writing professionally in 1998. A resident of Reeders, Pa., he spent over two years working at the "Eastern Pennsylvania Business Journal." Radenhausen received his bachelor's degree in English/professional writing from Kutztown University in 1997.

Photo Credits

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