Benefits of AISH

by Jon Hardy ; Updated July 27, 2017
AISH provides severly disabled Albertans with financial and health-care assistance.

Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped (AISH) is a program administered by the Alberta, Canada government to provide financial and health-care related assistance to disabled adults. Only adult citizens of Alberta deemed by a physician to have a severe handicap that "is permanent and substantially limits" one's ability to earn a living are eligible for the program. According to the Alberta government, AISH recipients receive a variety of financial, personal and health-care related benefits.

Financial Benefits

AISH provides program participants with a monthly living allowance. In 2010, the Alberta government provided a maximum of $1,188.00 per month to AISH recipients. The Alberta government can reduce or suspend AISH financial benefits if a program participant or cohabitating partner exceeds certain income limits, or if the program participant begins residing in a group home administered by the government of Alberta.

Health Benefits

The AISH program also assists program participants--and their cohabiting partners and dependent children--with health-care expenses, though any other available health-care plans must be accessed prior to AISH assuming responsibility for health-related costs. Prescription drugs, emergency ambulance services, diabetes supplies and dental care are some of the health benefits provided by AISH. Program recipients also have access to insurance through the Alberta Health Plan. The Alberta Health Plan can only be used inside the province of Alberta; however, program participants can apply to be reimbursed for eligible care received outside the province.

Personal Benefits

AISH can also provide program participants with what the Alberta government calls "personal benefits." Personal benefits assist clients with approved expenses that exceed the monthly AISH benefit amount. Alberta government guidelines restrict personal benefits to those whose income falls below a specified amount, have an immediate need of some sort, and are not covered by any other assistance program.

About the Author

based in Missouri, Jon Hardy has been writing since 1998. Hardy has worked as a ghostwriter and an online music reviewer for "AmpCamp.com," in addition to self-publishing a political news, gossip and commentary blog on state politics called MOGossip. Hardy attended Columbia College for undergraduate studies in writing and teaching.

Photo Credits

  • wheelchair access sign image by Gina Smith from Fotolia.com