How to Make a Car Payment Using Mastercard

by James Clark ; Updated July 27, 2017

Items you will need

  • MasterCard credit card
  • car payment bill or account number
  • telephone
  • computer with internet connection
  • postage stamps

Making a car payment using MasterCard is easy with a phone or Internet connection, or you can make the payment through the mail. While you might want to evaluate the financial wisdom of charging a car payment on a credit card, in a cash-strapped situation it could keep you from incurring a late fee and damaging your credit rating.

Step 1

Call the finance company that holds the title on your car and give the customer service representative your credit card number and expiration date. You will be asked to verify your identity, usually by providing a current address and the last 4 digits of your social security number.

Step 2

Set up an electronic payment plan online by visiting your lender's website and following the instructions to create an account so you can make car payments over the Internet.

Step 3

Mail your bill to the lender with your credit card number, the card's expiration date and your signature.

Step 4

Determine whether you have other options for making a car payment before adding the payment to your credit card. Chances are, the interest rate on your car loan is lower than the rate you pay to carry a balance on the credit card. If you make a habit of paying loans with credit cards, you will go deeper into debt and end up paying more for the car, in real dollars, than if you had made the payments directly to the car lender.

Tips

  • If you have to make a car payment with a MasterCard, try to place as little as possible debt on the card. Consider making the car payment with a mix of cash and credit charged to your card.

    If you have good credit, consider refinancing your car loan to lower your monthly payments so you can avoid using a credit card.

Warnings

  • Make sure your credit card balance is sufficient to charge the car payment so you don't incur an over-the-limit fee. Credit card companies are notorious for adding substantial fees and charges if the credit agreement terms are violated in any way.

About the Author

James Clark began his career in 1985. He has written about electronics, appliance repair and outdoor topics for a variety of publications and websites. He has more than four years of experience in appliance and electrical repairs. Clark holds a bachelor's degree in political science.