How Do I Make an Arrangement to Pay My Delinquent Property Taxes?

by Kenneth W. Michael Wills ; Updated July 27, 2017
Contact your county treasurer to make arrangements to pay deliquent property taxes.

If you are delinquent on your property taxes, your state law will dictate exactly what you need to do, to keep your property from going into foreclosure. State laws vary considerably as far as how long you have to bring the account current before going into foreclosure.

Some counties will accept partial payments on an account; however, keep in mind this does not mean partial payments will stop any foreclosure proceedings. If your home is already up for foreclosure, usually only a full payment will stop the process.

Step 1

Go to the office of the local official responsible for collecting property taxes; it could be your county treasurer or county clerk. Bring your latest tax statement with you. Ask to speak with someone regarding your past due property taxes.

Step 2

Ask the representative what options are available to work out a payment plan to pay your delinquent taxes. If your county will accept partial payments, ask the representative to draft an agreement to keep your account from going into foreclosure. If your account is already headed to foreclosure proceedings, you may need to pay your account in full. If this is the case, the county will only accept full payment; for relief you can contact your state's Department of Human Services, to find out if they can help provide relief. Another option you have is to file bankruptcy to stop the foreclosure; make sure you include your property taxes in the bankruptcy.

Step 3

Make all payments on time as stipulated in the agreement, if your county allows you to make partial payments under an agreement to bring your account current. Keep in mind, in addition to the taxes, you will need to pay any interest accrued on the debt according to you county treasurer’s office and any additional fees assessed for delinquency. If you miss payments per your agreement and your account goes to foreclosure, you will likely lose your home.

About the Author

Kenneth W. Michael Wills is a writer on culture, society and business. With more than 15 years of experience in sales, public relations and written communications, Wills' passion is delighting audiences with invigorating perspectives and refreshing ideas. He has ghostwritten articles on a diverse range of topics for corporate websites and composed proposals for organizations seeking growth opportunities.

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