How to Deposit Checks With a Power of Attorney on a Joint Account

If you've been appointed power of attorney for finances, you should be able to deposit checks if the power of attorney document states you have authority to do so, provided you follow the bank's procedure. If the document grants you that power, you shouldn't have a problem depositing checks, regardless as to whether the account is a joint account. It's important to know, however, that all banks have different policies and procedures.

Locate the power of attorney document. You'll need either a copy or the original, depending on the bank. Make sure the document gives you the power to make deposits.

Bring the power of attorney document to the bank. Banks must be presented with the document; this is so the bank has verification of the grant of authority to you. You'll need identification as well. It's wise to call the back to ask which forms of identification are acceptable. The bank might also require you and the individual who granted you power of attorney to present the document together in person.

Ask the bank to add a note to the account. Once the bank verifies the authenticity of the power of attorney document, it should make a note of your ability to make deposits, much like adding your name to the account.

Deposit checks. Once it's been noted that you have power of attorney, you should be able to make deposits. If the document only allows you to make deposits, the bank will make note of that.

Tips

  • All banks have different policies regarding procedure and power of attorney documents. As such, you should call the bank ahead of time and speak to a representative about acceptable forms of identification. Additionally, a representative can give you detailed information regarding whether the bank will accept a copy of the document, or whether it only accepts the original.

Warnings

  • Some banks require the person who made the power of attorney — known as the principal — to fill out a form. Additionally, some banks require the principal to appear in person with the individual to whom financial authority was granted. As such, you should contact the bank to obtain information about its policy.

References

About the Author

Ellis Roanhorse has been writing professionally since 2007. His work has been published in the "Loyola Law Review," "The Portland Mercury" and "Carillon Magazine." Roanhorse holds a Master of Arts in political science from the University of Chicago and a Juris Doctor from the Loyola Marymount School of Law.