Class B Driving Schools

by Wendy Morgan
Schools all over the United States offer class B driver training.

A Class B license allows a driver to operate vehicles that weigh over 26,000 pounds, such as buses, trucks, farm labor vehicles and trailers. Class B drivers must have the proper training at an accredited driving school to obtain their licenses. For those wanting to obtain a class B license, there are accredited schools all over the country that offer this training.

Classes

Classes at Class B driving schools are designed to prepare graduates to become professional entry-level Class B drivers. Courses at most schools are flexible, with day, evening and weekend classes and last three to four weeks. Students learn by hands-on training, with a standard Class B vehicle in training areas that include the highway, city roads and other heavy traffic areas.

Admissions

Prospective students applying for admission to a Class B driving school must meet all the admission requirements of their school of choice. These requirements may include having completed the written tests for the instruction permit, and having a valid driver's license prior beginning classes. Students may not have any unpaid parking or traffic tickets on their records and must often submit to a drug test before admission to most Class B driving schools.

Financial Aid

Financial aid and financing options are available to students at most Class B driving schools. Financial aid can include state and federal grants and student loans, and will depend on student employment, financial situation and credit record. Students will complete a financial aid application after being admitted to driving school.

Career Placement

Many Class B driving schools all over the United States offer career placement assistance to their graduates upon completion of courses. Some schools are also associated with driving companies that may hire students directly after graduation. Other schools may offer job resources and placement in a network of driving companies. Student should review the opportunities offered by their individual driving school.

About the Author

Wendy Morgan has been writing professionally since 2003, writing for Anderson University's annual literary publication "Ivy Leaves" as well as the campus newspaper. She writes and edits educational brochures for Tri-County Technical college and holds a Bachelor of Arts in communications from Anderson University.

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