How to Get a Certified Copy of Your House Deed

by Blaze Johnson ; Updated July 27, 2017

A house or property deed is an important document that affirms the transfer of real property from one owner to another. Several types of house deeds exist, such as “quitclaim,” “grant,” and “warranty.” Typically, a real estate attorney or title agent will send the required deed documentation to the local county recorder's office. Although having a certified copy of your house deed is not normally required, you may wish to keep a copy for your personal records.

Step 1

Contact your local county assessor's office and obtain your property's parcel number, legal description and date of last transfer. Provide any identifying information related to the property, such as the address and current owner. Obtaining the parcel number, legal description and date of last transfer may expedite the deed search process when dealing with certain local governments.

Step 2

Travel to the local recorder's office and ask for a certified copy of your house deed. If you cannot travel to the recorder's office, ask the representative if the office can mail a certified copy of your house deed.

Step 3

Provide any helpful information to the office representative, including the owner's name, parcel number, legal description and date of last transfer.

Step 4

Pay any required fees to the recorder's office, if necessary.

Tips

  • Keep the house deed with your personal records.

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About the Author

In the spring of 2008, Blaze Johnson decided to share his expertise through writing. He studied business administration at a local community college and runs his own driveway mechanic service, specializing in computer-controlled vehicles and custom car audio installs. Johnson also serves as the de facto computer repair person for his family, friends and coworkers.

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