How to Get Free Emergency Help for Low-Income Disabled People

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Dealing with a disability can be challenging enough without having to consider how you plan to pay for medical bills and other expenses. Federal, state and private programs offer a variety of cash aid programs to help low-income people who are disabled. In most cases, the application process is as simple as filling out a single form and providing supporting documentation, such as financial and medical records.

Phone the Department of Human Service or the Department of Social Service in your county of residence. Explain that you are disabled and need immediate cash aid. States like California offer Supplemental Security Income / State Supplementary Payment (SSI/SSP). The Social Security Administration's SSI program provides cash aid to individuals who are disabled. Contact the Social Security Administration at 800-325-0778 to check eligibility.

Apply for state aid. Medicaid is a state insurance program for disabled and low-income individuals as well as other groups. Contact Medicaid at 800-633-4227 to receive emergency assistance with your medical bills.

Apply for federal aid. Medicare is a federal insurance program for low-income, senior and disabled individuals. Contact Medicare by phone at 800-633-4227 to check eligibility. A representative can help you find and compare hospitals, home health agencies, nursing homes and dialysis facilities in your area that can provide emergency care.

Request emergency help with rent costs. Contact the Department of Human Services and apply for State Emergency Relief (SER). You must demonstrate financial hardship and show proof of income. Include a copy of your Social Security card with your application.

Visit a local office and speak with a Salvation Army worker about obtaining emergency relief funds. Complete a short in-person or over-the-phone interview. Explain your needs and check eligibility.

Tips

  • Appy for emergency assistance right away. Some programs require you to meet with an aid worker--in person or over the phone--before aid can be awarded.