How to Wire Money to Israel

by Ploni Almoni ; Updated July 27, 2017
ATMs are the most convenient way to send money to Israel.

Items you will need

  • U.S. bank account with cash available
  • PC with internet access (or telephone, or access to a wire transfer office)

The easiest, least expensive and fastest way to send money to Israel is to deposit money in a bank that recognizes ATMs in Israel (most major banks do). This requires some advance preparation, as the recipient has to have an account and an ATM card in Israel, and is therefore not always possible. Several commercial services are available to send money to Israel for a moderate fee. You may send money online, over the phone, or by visiting an wire transfer office in person.

Step 1

Select a commercial wire transfer service. Several are available with competitive rates, but be sure to choose one that has a pick-up location that is convenient for the recipient. Western Union maintains a commercial relationship with the Israel Postal Authority, which has hundreds of branches throughout the country.

Step 2

Log in to the selected wire transfer service. You will be required to create an account. If you do not have access to the Internet, some services will process transfers by phone or in person at one of their offices.

Step 3

Select the level of service you prefer: if the need is urgent or the transfer amount is very large, expect to pay a higher fee.

Step 4

Provide the relevant donor information (routing number and account number of a check, or credit card number) and recipient information (name and destination).

Step 5

Confirm the transaction. This may require answering a telephone call from the transfer office.

Step 6

Follow up by confirming the receipt of the money by the recipient.

Tips

  • Sending money by wire should be considered an emergency measure, for example if the recipient does not have a foreign bank account with an ATM card. It is far more convenient and less expensive to simply deposit money into the recipient's bank account, and allow the recipient to withdraw Israeli shekels through an ATM.

About the Author

Ploni Almoni began writing professionally in 1990. Since then, he has published widely in scholarly journals such as "Slavic Review," "Transcultural Psychiatry" and "Thought and Action." Almoni earned a Doctor of Philosophy in history from the University of Toronto.

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