Why Summer Jobs Are Important

by Jack Ori ; Updated July 27, 2017

Some parents expect teenagers to work during the summer, while others prefer their kids take a well-earned vacation after nine months of academic work. Holding a summer job gives teens both tangible and intangible benefits. They can earn their own money rather than relying on their parents for money, have something constructive to do during the summer, and get job experience. Pre-teens can reap some of these benefits by working at traditional children's jobs such as mowing lawns.

Financial Education

Kids do not learn about budgeting, saving and other important financial principles until they begin earning money of their own. By working during the summer, teens and pre-teens experience earning money for the first time and must decide what to do with the money they earn. Some parents require teens to put a portion of their earnings into savings for college, teaching them the value of saving for long-term goals.

Learn Responsibility

Young people who work during the summer months tend to do better in school, according to the Boston Private Industry Council. These kids learn the importance of being on time and doing what is asked of them. These skills often transfer over to their academic achievements once school begins again. In addition, teens and pre-teens who hold summer jobs tend to be more confident because they learn that they are able to be responsible.

Resume-Building

Kids who hold summer jobs have better chances of getting full-time employment once they reach adulthood. By being conscientious, responsible employees, they make connections that can give them reference letters for college or other employers or hire them on a full-time basis after they graduate high school. Students may also learn about various industries by working during the summer, which helps strengthen their post-graduation resumes and gives them a head start on figuring out what kind of career interests them.

Benefits Local Businesses

Local businesses can hire high school students over the summer to fill temporary vacancies without paying exorbitant fees to temporary placement agencies and can train workers who may eventually join the company full-time. In addition, kids who hold summer jobs are less likely to vandalize or rob businesses because they have something productive to do and a source of income.

About the Author

Jack Ori has been a writer since 2009. He has worked with clients in the legal, financial and nonprofit industries, as well as contributed self-help articles to various publications.