OHLAP College Requirements

by Kristie Sweet
Group of smiling young college graduates

The state of Oklahoma established a program that pays college tuition for qualifying students. Students must apply while in middle school or high school, come from a household earning less than $50,000 annually, pass specific high school classes, and stay out of trouble with the law to qualify for the Oklahoma Promise program--formerly known as OHLAP.

Program Requirement

Students only qualify if their parents' income from all sources totals $50,000 or less at the time of application and is no more than $100,000 when the student enters college. Students sign up when they are in eighth, ninth or 10th grade. Home-schooled students must be between 13 and 15 years old. Before reaching college age, applicants cannot be involved in gangs or criminal activity. In high school, applicants need certain course work: four English courses; three each of laboratory science, algebra and higher math, and history and citizenship; two foreign language or computer courses; one additional course from any of these sections; and a course in fine arts or speech. A 2.5 GPA is required.

Program Limitations

Only Oklahoma residents qualify. When applying for college, recipients must also apply for financial aid and notify the school's financial aid office that they have such funding. Recipients must enroll in college within three years of high school graduation. The funds are available for a maximum of five years and cannot be used for graduate school. Students must maintain a college GPA of 2.0 for the first two years and 2.5 after, and must not receive a suspension for more than a single semester. Students cannot use the funds the summer immediately following high school graduation, and funding does not cover fees or books.

About the Author

Kristie Sweet has been writing professionally since 1982, most recently publishing for various websites on topics like health and wellness, and education. She holds a Master of Arts in English from the University of Northern Colorado.

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