How to Expunge Eviction From Rental History

by Owen E. Richason IV ; Updated September 11, 2015

Records of evictions are typically placed on a renter’s credit report and are not part of criminal history but may also appear on the renter’s civil records. Renters who have been met by adverse circumstances and broken a lease can have the entry removed from either their personal credit report and/or civil records. Renters seeking to remove entries from their civil record should seek the advice of an attorney and consult the laws in their state, county or municipality. Such entries can affect the ability to secure a personal loan, credit card, car loan or lease, new residential lease or mortgage.

Order a copy of your personal credit report from each of the three credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. Consumers are entitled by law to one free copy of their personal credit report per calendar year.

Search public records database in your jurisdiction for civil records. Civil records are typically kept by the county or state clerk of the court. If an eviction was recorded and a lawsuit filed for an unpaid lease, the clerk of the court will have such records.

Evictions appearing on credit reports and/or on civil records may be disputed. Contact the landlord or leasing company and offer to pay a settlement or the balance via certified check in return for a notarized statement the debt has been satisfied.

Write a dispute letter to each credit bureau reporting the eviction and enclose a letter of explanation along with the notarized statement from the landlord or leasing company. Credit bureaus must verify all disputed items within 20 days or remove the entry.

Evictions appearing on civil records will require an order of expungement from a judge. If such records exist, petition the court of jurisdiction to grant an order of expungement. Requirements and standards to obtain such an order differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Provide the landlord or leasing company a copy of the order and supply a copy of that order to any credit bureau that is reporting the eviction.

About the Author

Owen Richason grew up working in his family's small contracting business. He later became an outplacement consultant, then a retail business consultant. Richason is a former personal finance and business writer for "Tampa Bay Business and Financier." He now writes for various publications, websites and blogs.