Can Section 8 Housing Terminate Assistance?

by Lauren Treadwell ; Updated July 27, 2017

The Housing Choice Voucher Program, or Section 8, allows people who have low to moderate household incomes to rent from private landlords and pay no more than 40 percent of their income in rent. The city, county or municipal housing authority pays the remainder of the rent with funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Section 8 has rules you must follow to continue receiving assistance.

Increase In Income

You must notify your housing authority caseworker if your income increases at any time while you are on Section 8 to ensure that you are still eligible for the program. Each housing authority sets its own income guidelines. If your income is above the threshold for your area's program, the HA will discontinue your assistance.

Tenant Behavior

You may lose your Section 8 voucher if you, members of your household or guests damage the property or cause frequent disturbances for neighbors. You may also lose your housing assistance if you do not keep the house in a sanitary, safe condition.

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Criminal Activity

If anyone in the household or any guests are involved in criminal activity on the property, Section 8 will terminate assistance. Tenants can appeal if they can prove they were uninvolved or unaware of the activity.

Recertification

Each housing authority requires you to recertify for assistance every 12 to 24 months. This requires you to provide the housing authority with documentation, including birth certificates, Social Security cards and proof of income for all members of the household. The housing authority may revoke your Section 8 assistance if you do not provide the necessary documentation or attend the required interview.

About the Author

Lauren Treadwell studied finance at Western Governors University and is an associate of the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors. Treadwell provides content to a number of prominent organizations, including Wise Bread, FindLaw and Discover Financial. As a high school student, she offered financial literacy lessons to fellow students.

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